This journal publishes studies of health and medicine that take a rhetorical perspective. Such studies combine rhetorical analysis with any number of other methodologies, including critical/cultural analysis, ethnography, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis. Rhetoric of Health & Medicine seeks to bring together humanities and social scientific research traditions in a rhetorically focused journal to allow scholars to build new interdisciplinary theories, methodologies, and insights that can impact our understanding of health, illness, healing, and wellness. 

Request for Proposals: Co-Editor of Rhetoric of Health & Medicine

2020-10-31

The co-editors and editorial board of the journal Rhetoric of Health & Medicine (RHM) are soliciting proposals for a co-editor with a five-year commitment. The appointed editor should be available to work with the current co-editors starting in the summer of 2021. They will be supported by a team of assistant editors and editorial assistants.

Response to Racial Injustice

2020-06-17

The co-editors of RHM want to empahsize the journal's commitment in cultivating, sponsoring, publishing, and promoting scholarship that addresses racism and interlocking systems of oppression as public health (and/or other health or medical) issues. We welcome queries or submissions around these important issues.

Vol. 5 No. 1 (2022)

Published: 2022-04-26

Variants and/in/of the Rhetoric of Health and Medicine

Cathryn Molloy; Kim Hensley Owens

1–10

Abstract

Editors' introduction to 5.1

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Civilian First Responder mHealth Apps, Interface Rhetoric, and Amplified Precarity

Candice Welhausen, Kristin Bivens

11–37

Abstract

Our article uses case studies of two civilian emergency response mHealth apps—PulsePoint and OD Help—to theorize the ways the mobile mapping...

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Tweeting Zebras: Social Networking and Relation in Rare Disease Advocacy

Tristin Brynn Hooker

93–122

Abstract

This article applies the lens of genre to the social media advocacy of three patient-activists—self-identified “zebras” whose rarely diagnosed...

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